Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Dennis Gelbaum Featured in '50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading"


Dennis Gelbaum, author of 'Beyond Reasonable Doubt', a novel with more twists and turns than a double helix - (http://www.beyondreasonabledoubtbook.com/) is featured in "50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading" by Danielle Hampson & Don McCauley and published by THE AUTHORS SHOW. This is the show's first book compiling some of the best guests who have appeared on both its online radio and TV versions of the show.

After conducting hundreds of interviews, it became very apparent that the number one issue common to most writers is the marketing of their books, rather than the writing and the production of the book itself.
http://www.wnbnetworkwest.com/WnbAuthorsShow50Writers.html

As "THE AUTHORS MARKETING POWER HOUSE", The Authors Show prides itself in giving authors a number of tools, many of which are free, to give their work the exposure they need. "50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading", gives these writers an added element for their book marketing campaign tool box, and presents to the reader some of the best writers this new world of publishing has to offer.

Hundreds of thousands of books are written and published every year. Each represents months, years - perhaps decades of arduous effort on the part of the author of that book. Though nearly all of these authors hope to achieve success, how that success is defined is specific to every individual writer.

"50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading" offers the stories of fifty such authors. As guests of The Authors Show, they have willingly bared their writer's souls to the world. Here you will find amazing stories of success and dismal tales of failure. You will hear narratives of dreams achieved and stories of hopes dashed. Above all you will
hear, from the mouths of these writers, what it means to become a successful author.

Whether you are just starting down the path to becoming a published author or have been a writer for many years, you will find much of interest here. Though it may not appear to be so, the fifty people within were not chosen because they demonstrated extraordinary writing skill, used well crafted phrases or achieved phenomenal sales. Instead the people within were chosen for their ability to verbalize their deep love for their craft, for the inspirational ideas they offer and, in some cases, for the sheer determination that caused them to become one of 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading.

AUTHORS FEATURED IN 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading
Art Adkins, Greg Allen, Billy Arcement, Beatrice Toney Bailey, Shobhan Bantwal, Jef Benedetti, Michelle Bersell, Rowena Cherry, Vera Jane Cook, Glen Copple, Chelle Cordero, Sandy Cropsey, Dane Cunningham, Aisha Curry, Christy Tillery French, Gene Garrison, Dennis Gelbaum, Kenneth Golde, Madeleine Herrman, Jessica James, Ken Jensen, Carl Jenks, Chloe Jon Paul, Mark David Gerson, J. Y. Jones, Sandra Bell Kirchman, Michael Kleiner, Jeff Knott, Mabel Leo, Sandy Lo, Alex Marcoux, Nancy Mehagian, John Meacham, Erica Miner, Ric Morgan, Robert Mottram, Carmen Navarro Talavera, Darden North, MD, Derek Randel, Alice Rene, Mary Paulson, Steven Rigolosi, Michael Rushnak, Frank Say, Paula Davies Scimeca, Debra Solice, Lois Stern, Janet Smit video

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

DNA Profiling Is A Powerful Forensic Tool


"When used correctly, DNA profiling is a powerful forensic tool. It can be used to quickly eliminate a suspect, saving time in searches for perpetrators. And it can provide compelling evidence to support a conviction and, most importantly, reduce the chances of a wrongful conviction." Author: Jacqui Wittmeyer, "Can DNA Demand A Verdict?"
Check out the article at: http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/labs/gel/forensics/

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

It is now possible to fake DNA fingerprinting evidence.

DNA fingerprinting, invented by Sir Alec Jeffreys is considered a "gold standard" crime fighting technology. It's based on the fact that everyone's genome is unique (apart from identical twins) and has proved to be pretty persuasive in the courtroom. However, like all technology it is not infallible, but could its credibility be undermined by a team of scientists in Israel who have demonstrated that it is possible to manipulate a crime scene by faking DNA evidence?

Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/science/genetics/articles/46174.aspx

To get his hands on his inheritance, Jason Warren has to convince a jury that his step father, who had been convicted of killing his mother, did not commit the crime he was convicted of. Hal Warren was convicted solely on DNA found at the crime scene. But he always claimed he did not murder his wife. Read more in Beyond Reasonable Doubt, the novel by Dennis Gelbaum.

DNA evidence can be fabricated: 'You can engineer a crime scene'


Scientists in Israel have demonstrated that it is possible to fabricate DNA evidence, undermining the credibility of what has been considered the gold standard of proof in criminal cases. Check out the story and the video at: http://www.bookofjoe.com/2010/01/dna-evidence-can-be-fabricated-you-can-engineer-a-crime-scene.html

Salting Crime Scenes with Fake DNA Becomes Possible

When Dan Frumkin and his team recently announced they had finally discovered a way to clearly distinguish between natural and artificial (fake) DNA samples, not many people understood why their discovery generated so much interest in the international media. Read more at: http://www.islamonline.net/servlet/Satellite?c=Article_C&pagename=Zone-English-HealthScience%2FHSELayout&cid=1256910021588

Hal Warren was convicted of killing his wife, solely on DNA found at the crime scene, But he claimed he was innocent - right up to the time he hung himself in his prison cell.
If he did not commit the crime, who did? And where did the DNA evidence come from?

DNA Evidence Can Be Fabricated, Scientists Show

Scientists in Israel have demonstrated that it is possible to fabricate DNA evidence, undermining the credibility of what has been considered the gold standard of proof in criminal cases. Read more at: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/18/science/18dna.html

Did planted and fabricated DNA evidence help to convict Hal Warren of killing his wife? Read more in Beyond Reasonable Doubt, the novel by Dennis Gelbaum.